CARTA ENCICLICA REDEMPTOR HOMINIS PDF

REDEMPTOR HOMINIS TO HIS VENERABLE BROTHERS IN THE EPISCOPATE THE PRIESTS THE RELIGIOUS FAMILIES THE SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF. Análisis Redención de Jesús al mundo. La centralidad de la persona humana. Conclusiones Encíclica Redemptor Hominis Carta Encíclica. Buy Encíclica “Redemptor hominis”: carta encíclica del Sumo Pontífice Juan Pablo II, 4-III by Santo – II Juan Pablo II – Papa (ISBN: ) from.

Author: Zulugore Zulugis
Country: Guadeloupe
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Sex
Published (Last): 24 May 2007
Pages: 347
PDF File Size: 18.90 Mb
ePub File Size: 2.84 Mb
ISBN: 932-7-66583-291-4
Downloads: 81641
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Daigami

To him go my thoughts and my heart in this solemn moment of the world that the Church and the whole family of present-day humanity are now living. In fact, this time, in which God in his hidden design has entrusted to me, after my beloved Predecessor John Paul I, the universal service connected with the Chair of Saint Peter in Rome, is already very close to the year At this moment it is difficult to say what mark that year will leave on the face of human history or what it will bring to each people, nation, country and continent, in spite of the efforts already being made to foresee some events.

For the Church, the People of God spread, although unevenly, to the most distant limits of the earth, it will be the year of a great Jubilee. We are already approaching that date, which, without prejudice to all the corrections imposed by chronological exactitude, will recall and reawaken in us in a special way our awareness of the key truth of faith which Saint John expressed at the beginning of his Gospel: We also are in a certain way in a season of a new Advent, a season of expectation: This act of redemption marked the high point of the history of man within God’s loving plan.

God entered the history of humanity and, as a man, became an actor in that history, one of the thousands of millions of human beings but at the same time Unique! Through the Incarnation God gave human life the dimension that he intended man to have from his first beginning; he has granted that dimension definitively-in the way that is peculiar to him alone, in keeping with his eternal love and mercy, with the full freedom of God-and he has granted it also with the bounty that enables us, in considering the original sin and the whole history of the sins of humanity, and in considering the errors of the human intellect, will and heart, to repeat with amazement the words of the Sacred Liturgy: It was to Christ the Redeemer that my feelings and my thoughts were directed on 16 October of last year, when, after the canonical election, I was asked: Today I wish to make that reply known publicly to all without exception, thus showing that there is a link between the first fundamental truth of the Incarnation, already mentioned, and the ministry that, with my acceptance of my election as Bishop of Rome and Successor of the Apostle Peter, has become my specific duty in his See.

I chose the same names that were chosen by my beloved Predecessor John Paul I. Indeed, as soon as he announced to the Sacred College on 26 August that he wished to be called John Paul-such a double name being unprecedented in the history of the Papacy-I saw in it a clear presage of grace for the new pontificate.

Since that pontificate lasted barely 33 days, it falls to me not only to continue it but in a certain sense to take it up again at the same starting point. This is confirmed by my choice of these two names. By following the example of my venerable Predecessor in choosing them, I wish like him to express my love for the unique inheritance left to the Church by Popes John XXIII and Paul VI and my personal readiness to develop that inheritance with God’s help.

Through these two names and two pontificates I am linked with the whole tradition of the Apostolic See and with all my Predecessors in the expanse of the twentieth century and of the preceding centuries.

John Paul II | LibraryThing

I am connected, through one after another of the various ages back to the most remote, with the line of the mission and ministry that confers on Peter’s See an altogether special place in the Church. John XXIII and Paul VI are a stage to which I wish to refer directly as a threshold from which I intend to continue, in a certain sense together with John Paul I, into the future, letting myself be guided by unlimited trust in and obedience to the Spirit that Christ promised and sent to his Church.

On the night before he suffered he said to his apostles: Entrusting myself fully to the Spirit of truth, therefore, I am entering into the rich inheritance of the recent pontificates.

This inheritance has struck deep roots in the awareness of the Church in an utterly new way, quite unknown previously, thanks to the Second Vatican Council, which John XXIII convened and opened and which was later successfully concluded and perseveringly put into effect by Paul VI, whose activity I was myself able to watch from close at hand.

I was constantly amazed at his profound wisdom and his courage and also by his constancy and patience in the difficult postconciliar period of his pontificate. As helmsman of the Church, the bark of Peter, he knew how to preserve a providential tranquillity and balance even in the most critical moments, when the Church seemed to be shaken from within, and he always maintained unhesitating hope in the Church’s solidity.

What the Spirit said to the Church through the Council of our time, what the Spirit says in this Church to all the Churches 8 cannot lead to anything else-in spite of momentary uneasinesses-but still more mature solidity of the whole People of God, aware of their salvific mission. Paul VI selected this present-day consciousness of the Church as the first theme in his fundamental Encyclical beginning with the words Ecclesiam Suam.

Let me refer first of all to this Encyclical and link myself with it in this first document that, so to speak, inaugurates the present pontificate.

The Church’s consciousness, enlightened and supported by the Holy Spirit and fathoming more and more deeply both her divine mystery and her human mission, and even her human weaknesses-this consciousness is and must remain the first source of the Church’s love, as love in turn helps to strengthen and deepen her consciousness.

Paul VI left us a witness of such an extremely acute consciousness of the Church. Through the many things, often causing suffering, that went to make up his pontificate he taught us intrepid love for the Church, which is, as the Council states, a “sacrament or sign and means of intimate union with God, and of the unity of all mankind” 9. Precisely for this reason, the Church’s consciousness must go with universal openness, in order that all may be able to find in her “the unsearchable riches of Christ” 10 spoken of by the Apostle of the Gentiles.

  INTRODUCTION TO PARALLEL COMPUTING 2ND EDITION ANANTH GRAMA PDF

Such openness, organically joined with the awareness of her own nature and certainty of her own truth, of which Christ said: At the same time she must carry on the dialogue that Paul VI, in his Encyclical Ecclesiam Suam called “the dialogue of salvation”, distinguishing with precision the various circles within which it was carra be carried on In referring today to this document that gave the programme of Paul VI’s pontificate, Rwdemptor keep thanking God that this great Predecessor of mine, who was also truly my father, knew how to display ad extra, externally, the true countenance of the Church, in spite of the various internal weaknesses that affected her in the postconciliar period.

In this way much of the human family has become, it seems, more aware, in all humanity’s various spheres of existence, of how really necessary the Church of Christ, her mission and her service are to humanity. At times this awareness has proved stronger than the various critical attitudes attacking ab intra, internally, the Church, her institutions and structures, and ecclesiastics and their activities.

This growing criticism was certainly due to various causes and we are furthermore sure that it was not always without sincere love for the Church. Undoubtedly one of the tendencies it displayed was to overcome homminis has been called triumphalism, about which there was frequent discussion during the Council. While it is right that, in accordance with the example of her Master, who is “humble in heart” 13the Church also should have humility as her foundation, that she should have a critical sense with regard to all that goes to make up her human character and activity, and that she should always be very demanding on herself, nevertheless criticism too should have its just limits.

Encíclica Redemptor Hominis by Jennifer Correa on Prezi

Otherwise it ceases to be constructive and does not reveal truth, love and thankfulness for the grace in which we become sharers principally and fully in and through the Church. Furthermore such criticism does not express an attitude cqrta service but rather a wish to direct the opinion of others in accordance with one’s own, which is at times spread abroad in too thoughtless a manner. Gratitude is due to Paul VI because, while respecting every particle of truth contained in the various human opinions, he preserved at the same time the providential balance of the bark’s helmsman The Church that I-through John Paul I-have had entrusted to me almost immediately after him is admittedly not free of internal difficulties and tension.

At the same time, however, she is internally more strengthened against the excesses of self-criticism: God “desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth” In spite of all appearances, the Church is rdemptor more united in the fellowship of service and in the awareness of apostolate. This unity springs from the principle of collegiality, mentioned by the Second Vatican Council.

Christ himself made this principle a living part of the apostolic College of the Twelve with Peter at their head, and gedemptor is continuously renewing it in the College of the Bishops, which is growing more and more over all the earth, remaining united with and under the guidance of the Successor of Saint Peter.

The Council did more than mention the principle hominus collegiality: The principle of collegiality showed itself particularly relevant in the difficult postconciliar period, when the shared unanimous position of the College of the Bishops-which displayed, chiefly through the Synod, its union with Peter’s Successor-helped to dissipate doubts and at the same time indicated the correct ways for renewing hominnis Church in her universal dimension.

Indeed, the Synod was the source, among other things, of that essential momentum for evangelization that found expression in the Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Nuntiandi 17which was so joyously welcomed as a programme for renewal which was both apostolic and also pastoral.

The same line was followed in the work of the last ordinary session of the Synod of the Bishops, held about a year before the death of Pope Paul VI redfmptor dedicated, as is known, to catechesis.

The results of this work have still to be arranged and enunciated by the Apostolic See.

As we are dealing with the evident development of the forms in which episcopal collegiality is expressed, mention must be made at least of the process of consolidation of National Episcopal Conferences throughout the Church and of other collegial structures of an international or continental character. Referring also to the centuries old tradition of the Church, attention should be directed to the activity of the various diocesan, provincial and national Synods.

It was the Council’s idea, an idea consistently put into practice by Paul VI, that structures of this kind, with their centuries of trial by the Church, and the other forms of collegial collaboration by Bishops, such as the metropolitan structure-not to mention each individual diocese-should pulsate in full awareness of their own identity and, at the same time, enciclicaa their own originality within the universal unity of the Church.

The same spirit of collaboration and shared responsibility is spreading among priests also, as is confirmed by the many Councils of Priests that have sprung up since the Council. That spirit has extended also among the laity, not only strengthening the already existing organizations for lay apostolate but also creating new ones that often have a different outline and excellent dynamism. Furthermore, lay people conscious of their responsibility for the Church have willingly committed themselves to collaborating with the Pastors and with the representatives of the Institutes of consecrated life, in the spheres of the diocesan Synods and of the pastoral Councils in the rwdemptor and dioceses.

I must keep all this in mind at the beginning of my pontificate as a reason for giving thanks to God, for warmly encouraging all my brothers and sisters and for recalling with heartfelt gratitude the work of the Second Vatican Council and my great Predecessors, who set in motion this new surge of life for the Church, a movement that is much stronger than the symptoms of doubt, collapse and crisis.

Rwdemptor shall I say of all the initiatives that have sprung from the new ecumenical orientation? The unforgettable Pope John XXIII set out the problem of Christian unity with evangelical clarity as a simple consequence of the will of Jesus Christ himself, our Master, the will that Jesus stated on several occasions but to which he gave expression in a special way in his prayer in the Upper Room the night before he died: The Second Vatican Council responded concisely to this requirement with its Decree on ecumenism.

  DAVIS NEWSTROM COMPORTAMIENTO HUMANO EN EL TRABAJO PDF

Pope Paul VI, availing himself of the activities of the Secretariat for Promoting Christian Unity, began the first difficult steps on the road to the attainment of that unity. Have we rwdemptor far along that road? Without wishing to give a detailed reply, we can say that we have made real and important advances. And one thing is certain: It is also certain that in the present historical situation of Christianity and the world eniclica only possibility we see of fulfilling the Church’s universal mission, with regard to ecumenical questions, is that of seeking sincerely, perseveringly, humbly and also courageously the ways of drawing closer and of union.

Pope Paul VI gave us his personal example for this.

John Paul II (1920–2005)

We must therefore seek unity without encicica discouraged at the difficulties that can appear or accumulate along that road; otherwise we would be unfaithful to the word of Christ, we would fail to accomplish his testament. Have we the right to run this risk? There are people who in the face of the difficulties or because they consider that the first ecumenical endeavours have brought negative results would have liked to turn back.

Some even express the opinion that these efforts are harmful to the cause of the Gospel, enciclics leading to a further rupture in the Church, are causing confusion of ideas in questions of faith and morals and are ending up with a specific indifferentism. It is perhaps a good thing that the spokesmen for these opinions should express their fears.

However, in this respect also, correct limits must be maintained. It is obvious that this new stage in the Church’s life demands of us a faith that is particularly aware, profound and responsible. True ecumenical activity encicljca openness, drawing closer, availability revemptor dialogue, and a shared investigation of the truth in the full evangelical and Christian sense; but in no way does it or can it mean giving up or in any way diminishing the treasures of divine truth that the Church has constantly confessed and taught.

To all who, for whatever motive, would wish to dissuade the Church from seeking the universal unity of Christians the question must once again be put: Have we the right not to do it? Can we fail to have trust-in spite of all human weakness and all the faults of past centuries-in our Lord’s grace as revealed recently through what the Holy Spirit said and we heard during the Council? If we were to do so, we would deny the truth concerning ourselves that was so eloquently expressed by the Apostle: What we eciclica just said must also be applied-although in another way and with the due differences-to activity for coming closer together with the representatives of the non-Christian religions, homunis activity expressed through dialogue, contacts, prayer in common, investigation of the treasures of human spirituality, in which, as we reemptor well, the enciclicaa of these religions also are not lacking.

Does it not sometimes happen that the firm belief of the followers of farta non-Christian religions-a belief that is also an effect of the Spirit of truth operating outside the visible confines of the Mystical Reddmptor make Christians ashamed at being often themselves so disposed to doubt concerning the truths revealed by God and proclaimed by the Church and so prone to relax moral principles and open the way to ethical permissiveness.

It is a noble thing to have a predisposition wnciclica understanding every person, analyzing every system and recognizing what is right; this does not at all mean losing certitude about one’s own faith 20 or weakening the principles of morality, the lack of which will soon make itself felt in the life of whole societies, with deplorable consequences besides.

While the ways on which the Council of this century has set the Church going, ways indicated by the late Pope Carat VI in his first Encyclical, will continue to be for a long time the ways that all of us must follow, we can at the same time rightly ask at this new stage: How, in what manner should we continue? What should we do, in order that this new advent of the Church connected with the approaching end of the second millennium may bring us closer to him whom Sacred Scripture calls “Everlasting Father”, Pater futuri saeculi 21?

This is the fundamental question that the new Pope must put acrta himself on accepting in enciiclica spirit of obedience in faith the call corresponding to the command that Christ gave Peter several times: Be the shepherd of my sheepfold, and again: To this question, dear Brothers, sons and daughters, a fundamental and essential response must be given.

Our response must be: Our spirit is set in one direction, the only direction for our intellect, will and heart is-towards Christ our Redeemer, towards Christ, the Redeemer of man.

We wish to look towards him-because there is salvation in no one else but him, the Son of God-repeating what Peter said: You have the words of eternal life” Through the Church’s consciousness, which the Council considerably developed, through all levels of this self-awareness, and through all the fields of activity in which the Church expresses, finds and confirms herself, we must constantly aim at him “who is the head” 25″through whom are all things and through whom we exist” 26who is both “the way, and the truth” 27 and “the resurrection and the life”, 28seeing whom, we see the Father 29and who had to go away from us 30 -that is, by his death on the Cross and then by his Ascension into heaven-in order that the Counsellor should come to us and should keep coming to us as the Spirit of truth In him are “all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” 32and the Church is his Body The Church does not cease to listen to his words.

She rereads them continually. With the greatest devotion she reconstructs every detail of his life.

Author: admin